So HOW Is Judgment Day a Blessing?

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Luke 12:32–40 (CSB)

32 Don’t be afraid, little flock, because your Father delights to give you the kingdom. 33 Sell your possessions and give to the poor. Make money-bags for yourselves that won’t grow old, an inexhaustible treasure in heaven, where no thief comes near and no moth destroys. 34 For where your treasure is, there your heart will be also.

 

35 “Be ready for service and have your lamps lit. 36 You are to be like people waiting for their master to return from the wedding banquet so that when he comes and knocks, they can open the door for him at once. 37 Blessed will be those servants the master finds alert when he comes. Truly I tell you, he will get ready, have them recline at the table, then come and serve them. 38 If he comes in the middle of the night, or even near dawn, and finds them alert, blessed are those servants. 39 But know this: If the homeowner had known at what hour the thief was coming, he would not have let his house be broken into. 40 You also be ready, because the Son of Man is coming at an hour you do not expect.”

Dear fellow redeemed: Last Sunday we heard and reflected on Jesus’ words that our lives do not consist in having lots of possessions, and that in the eternal scale of things, what is important is to be rich toward God, that is, to  to have faith, to trust that God is the giver of all things, including life and salvation, not “stuff.”

That teaching was to “vast multitudes” who had gathered to hear Jesus. Jesus then turns to his disciples and talks about how we live this way, as Christians. Our worries are subdued by faith in Christ. Jesus sums up this way: “But seek his kingdom, and these things will be provided for you.” (Luke 12:31, CSB)

This is really where our faith is lacking. It is typical that we do not comprehend what God does for us. Consider what you have been given already this day: Your life. All the physical and mental strength that you have enjoyed over your lifetime. Spiritual life and faith and the forgiveness of your sins. And the gospel that like an eternal fountain, the water of life, pours faith-sustaining mercy and forgiveness into our lives.

And while providing you with forgiveness and salvation, He hasn’t forgotten to provide other things we need as well, the necessities of daily life – food, clothing, cell phones.

This makes sense to us because as Christians we honestly life our life with a view to the eternal things. With that as our treasure, “inexhaustible money-bags,” Jesus says we are …

READY FOR THE ETERNAL FEAST

  1. Ready for the Lord
  2. The Lord Who Serves
  3. We Just Don’t Know When 

    1.  Ready for the Lord

Jesus paints three pictures of what it means to be ready. The first picture Jesus paints is of readiness for deliverance. “Be ready for service and have your lamps lit,” He says. The terms He uses are taken from the Passover scene from Genesis. “Be ready for service” means, “Be ready to go.” The Jews were in slavery, and that Passover night the Lord would bring judgment on the Egyptians and deliver the Children of Israel from slavery to freedom.” Are you ready to leave this vale of tears for the eternal land of milk and honey, the promised land of the resurrection?

Are living your life with a view to the eternal things?

Jesus paints another picture: 36 You are to be like people waiting for their master to return from the wedding banquet so that when he comes and knocks, they can open the door for him at once. 37 Blessed will be those servants the master finds alert when he comes.

This isn’t a picture we are familiar with. If I am at a banquet and I return, there is no expectation of someone to meet me, take care of my needs, maybe a midnight snack, make up the bed, and so on. But among the rich that was the custom. By contrast there were the slaves, who were to be ready for the master’s call. I suppose our parallel might be taking the late flight into Chicago and going to the Westin hotel. What would you think if you were left at the door with nobody to open up and show you to your room? They should be ready whenever you arrived. That’s the kind of readiness Jesus to which Jesus calls us.

2. The Lord Who Serves

But still, there is a difference. Jesus says that the slaves are blessed when the master arrives home. “38 If he comes in the middle of the night, or even near dawn, and finds them alert, blessed are those servants.” How is that? Amazingly, He says, 37 Blessed will be those servants the master finds alert when he comes. Truly I tell you, he [the master] will get ready, have them recline at the table, then come and serve them. When the master returns, he will feast the slaves, his servants. Are you ready for the Lord to come and lay out the eternal feast of the resurrection?

You know, this is where you are most privileged to be Christians who are connected directly through the Bible to the teaching of Christ. We call ourselves “Confessional Lutherans” today, but in actuality our faith goes back to the apostles, to Christ, to the Prophets, Moses, Abraham, and the rest. We are privileged because we know Christ as our servant.

That seems disrespectful, even blasphemous, but that is what Jesus is saying here, and not just here. When His disciples were arguing over which of them was the greatest, here’s what Jesus said, “But he said to them, “The kings of the Gentiles lord it over them, and those who have authority over them have themselves called ‘Benefactors.’ It is not to be like that among you. On the contrary, whoever is greatest among you should become like the youngest, and whoever leads, like the one serving. For who is greater, the one at the table or the one serving? Isn’t it the one at the table? But I am among you as the one who serves.” (Luke 22:25–27, CSB)

And that is our only hope, for who of us can save ourselves? Who of us can atone for our sins?

3. We Just Don’t Know When

And then there is one more call to readiness that Jesus gives: 39 But know this: If the homeowner had known at what hour the thief was coming, he would not have let his house be broken into. 40 You also be ready, because the Son of Man is coming at an hour you do not expect.”

The criminal chooses the time and the place for his crime, which is why we keep our doors locked all of the time, and why we foster situational awareness and readiness to avoid being victimized. Jesus is saying that if we are in a state of readiness, then we will greet Him with joy when He comes again, or when we die.

Every person has a future. Everyone will live (how long?) and every person will die. That much everyone knows. But as Christians we know that there is an eternal feast waiting for us, to make use of one picture. Another way to think of it is that everything that is good and right and beautiful and pleasant and joyful is only a shadow of the true good, right and beautiful that awaits us.

There are times when Jesus stresses the judgment that is to come in order to call people to repentance. But as he speaks with His disciples here, and with us, he wants us to be ready, not just for judgment, but for salvation.

The people of our secular culture know that we live and then die, and they live according to that empty faith. Everything is about the here and now. The total preoccupation with politics is to build a perfect world here and now. The obsession with possessions is to live life to the fullest here and now, before death ends it all. The devotion to death in the form of abortion and euthanasia and suicide reflects their doctrine that if life isn’t wonderful, and this life is all that there is, then might as well end it.

Do we live like the here and now is all in all? Are we so affected by our culture that even though we know better, we give scarcely a thought to what awaits us in that bright land and that new shore?

Do we live like our story ends in tragedy? Do we live in anxiety and fear? Or do we live like we really should, knowing that our story ends in joy everlasting? We will all face troubles and struggles in life, and we will make it through. But when the time comes when the illness is our last, or our eyes close for the last time, or our life suddenly comes to and end. In other words, when our Master calls us, to be ready is to know that the grave is the door to life, as Jesus told Martha, grieving over Lazarus, “Jesus said to her, “I am the resurrection and the life. The one who believes in me, even if he dies, will live. Everyone who lives and believes in me will never die. Do you believe this?” (John 11:25–26, CSB)

Jesus says, “38 If he comes in the middle of the night, or even near dawn, and finds them alert, blessed are those servants.

How will you be alert? Be ready? By being in the word, by being with your fellow Christians to encourage and be encouraged. To think about your salvation and make it your treasure, in the ageless money-bags of your immortal soul. For what awaits you is an inexhaustible treasure that is yours because your sin has been exchanged for Christ’s righteousness, and because you have a place in heaven.

Think about it. Savor it so that when hardship comes you realize that the reminders of heaven are no mere platitude, no mere tired expression, but the eternal joy tasted by all the saints in heaven, to be complete in the resurrection.

Reflect upon what awaits you that, as Paul writes, “Christ may dwell in your hearts through faith. I pray that you, being rooted and firmly established in love, may be able to comprehend with all the saints what is the length and width, height and depth of God’s love, and to know Christ’s love that surpasses knowledge, so that you may be filled with all the fullness of God.” (Ephesians 3:17–19, CSB)

AMEN